Marian
La imagen para vivir. Reflejos
Marian
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5centsapound:

Jaber Al Azmeh: A Small Group of Syrians (2012)
A small group of Free Syrians offer their words….
This project takes on one of the Syrian Government’s most prominent symbols – The Ba’ath Newspaper – as part and parcel of the Baath Security State - and here turns it upside down to be a surface of new thoughts written by the Syrian people thus overturning the daily chronicle of government lies.
We emphasize also that the comments are directed not particularly to the Ba’ath but rather to ‘The Regime’ itself. Each participant was invited to use the newspaper or write some words to symbolize his or her thoughts within the general idea of the revolution.
Those are Syrians. Here are their words.
*english translations in image captions
read more via creativetime
5centsapound:

Jaber Al Azmeh: A Small Group of Syrians (2012)
A small group of Free Syrians offer their words….
This project takes on one of the Syrian Government’s most prominent symbols – The Ba’ath Newspaper – as part and parcel of the Baath Security State - and here turns it upside down to be a surface of new thoughts written by the Syrian people thus overturning the daily chronicle of government lies.
We emphasize also that the comments are directed not particularly to the Ba’ath but rather to ‘The Regime’ itself. Each participant was invited to use the newspaper or write some words to symbolize his or her thoughts within the general idea of the revolution.
Those are Syrians. Here are their words.
*english translations in image captions
read more via creativetime
5centsapound:

Jaber Al Azmeh: A Small Group of Syrians (2012)
A small group of Free Syrians offer their words….
This project takes on one of the Syrian Government’s most prominent symbols – The Ba’ath Newspaper – as part and parcel of the Baath Security State - and here turns it upside down to be a surface of new thoughts written by the Syrian people thus overturning the daily chronicle of government lies.
We emphasize also that the comments are directed not particularly to the Ba’ath but rather to ‘The Regime’ itself. Each participant was invited to use the newspaper or write some words to symbolize his or her thoughts within the general idea of the revolution.
Those are Syrians. Here are their words.
*english translations in image captions
read more via creativetime
5centsapound:

Jaber Al Azmeh: A Small Group of Syrians (2012)
A small group of Free Syrians offer their words….
This project takes on one of the Syrian Government’s most prominent symbols – The Ba’ath Newspaper – as part and parcel of the Baath Security State - and here turns it upside down to be a surface of new thoughts written by the Syrian people thus overturning the daily chronicle of government lies.
We emphasize also that the comments are directed not particularly to the Ba’ath but rather to ‘The Regime’ itself. Each participant was invited to use the newspaper or write some words to symbolize his or her thoughts within the general idea of the revolution.
Those are Syrians. Here are their words.
*english translations in image captions
read more via creativetime
5centsapound:

Jaber Al Azmeh: A Small Group of Syrians (2012)
A small group of Free Syrians offer their words….
This project takes on one of the Syrian Government’s most prominent symbols – The Ba’ath Newspaper – as part and parcel of the Baath Security State - and here turns it upside down to be a surface of new thoughts written by the Syrian people thus overturning the daily chronicle of government lies.
We emphasize also that the comments are directed not particularly to the Ba’ath but rather to ‘The Regime’ itself. Each participant was invited to use the newspaper or write some words to symbolize his or her thoughts within the general idea of the revolution.
Those are Syrians. Here are their words.
*english translations in image captions
read more via creativetime
5centsapound:

Jaber Al Azmeh: A Small Group of Syrians (2012)
A small group of Free Syrians offer their words….
This project takes on one of the Syrian Government’s most prominent symbols – The Ba’ath Newspaper – as part and parcel of the Baath Security State - and here turns it upside down to be a surface of new thoughts written by the Syrian people thus overturning the daily chronicle of government lies.
We emphasize also that the comments are directed not particularly to the Ba’ath but rather to ‘The Regime’ itself. Each participant was invited to use the newspaper or write some words to symbolize his or her thoughts within the general idea of the revolution.
Those are Syrians. Here are their words.
*english translations in image captions
read more via creativetime
5centsapound:

Jaber Al Azmeh: A Small Group of Syrians (2012)
A small group of Free Syrians offer their words….
This project takes on one of the Syrian Government’s most prominent symbols – The Ba’ath Newspaper – as part and parcel of the Baath Security State - and here turns it upside down to be a surface of new thoughts written by the Syrian people thus overturning the daily chronicle of government lies.
We emphasize also that the comments are directed not particularly to the Ba’ath but rather to ‘The Regime’ itself. Each participant was invited to use the newspaper or write some words to symbolize his or her thoughts within the general idea of the revolution.
Those are Syrians. Here are their words.
*english translations in image captions
read more via creativetime
5centsapound:

Jaber Al Azmeh: A Small Group of Syrians (2012)
A small group of Free Syrians offer their words….
This project takes on one of the Syrian Government’s most prominent symbols – The Ba’ath Newspaper – as part and parcel of the Baath Security State - and here turns it upside down to be a surface of new thoughts written by the Syrian people thus overturning the daily chronicle of government lies.
We emphasize also that the comments are directed not particularly to the Ba’ath but rather to ‘The Regime’ itself. Each participant was invited to use the newspaper or write some words to symbolize his or her thoughts within the general idea of the revolution.
Those are Syrians. Here are their words.
*english translations in image captions
read more via creativetime
5centsapound:

Jaber Al Azmeh: A Small Group of Syrians (2012)
A small group of Free Syrians offer their words….
This project takes on one of the Syrian Government’s most prominent symbols – The Ba’ath Newspaper – as part and parcel of the Baath Security State - and here turns it upside down to be a surface of new thoughts written by the Syrian people thus overturning the daily chronicle of government lies.
We emphasize also that the comments are directed not particularly to the Ba’ath but rather to ‘The Regime’ itself. Each participant was invited to use the newspaper or write some words to symbolize his or her thoughts within the general idea of the revolution.
Those are Syrians. Here are their words.
*english translations in image captions
read more via creativetime
5centsapound:

Jaber Al Azmeh: A Small Group of Syrians (2012)
A small group of Free Syrians offer their words….
This project takes on one of the Syrian Government’s most prominent symbols – The Ba’ath Newspaper – as part and parcel of the Baath Security State - and here turns it upside down to be a surface of new thoughts written by the Syrian people thus overturning the daily chronicle of government lies.
We emphasize also that the comments are directed not particularly to the Ba’ath but rather to ‘The Regime’ itself. Each participant was invited to use the newspaper or write some words to symbolize his or her thoughts within the general idea of the revolution.
Those are Syrians. Here are their words.
*english translations in image captions
read more via creativetime
+
audiovision:
All of these photos were taken in prison.
At The Community Prisoner Mother Program in Pomona a select group of low level offenders can live with their young children until the child turns seven years old.
In 2011 and 2012, 233 inmates in California’s prison system gave birth while serving their sentences.
In most cases, the newborns went to live with relatives while the women were in prison, but some women had the opportunity to live with their children behind bars.
Learn more about the last prisoner-baby program in California and how the penal system handles these new mothers on KPCC’s Pregnant In Prison special coverage.
KPCC is doing some awesome things. Check out this extensive reporting and lovely photos. -Emily
Photo Credit: Mae Ryan/KPCC
audiovision:
All of these photos were taken in prison.
At The Community Prisoner Mother Program in Pomona a select group of low level offenders can live with their young children until the child turns seven years old.
In 2011 and 2012, 233 inmates in California’s prison system gave birth while serving their sentences.
In most cases, the newborns went to live with relatives while the women were in prison, but some women had the opportunity to live with their children behind bars.
Learn more about the last prisoner-baby program in California and how the penal system handles these new mothers on KPCC’s Pregnant In Prison special coverage.
KPCC is doing some awesome things. Check out this extensive reporting and lovely photos. -Emily
Photo Credit: Mae Ryan/KPCC
audiovision:
All of these photos were taken in prison.
At The Community Prisoner Mother Program in Pomona a select group of low level offenders can live with their young children until the child turns seven years old.
In 2011 and 2012, 233 inmates in California’s prison system gave birth while serving their sentences.
In most cases, the newborns went to live with relatives while the women were in prison, but some women had the opportunity to live with their children behind bars.
Learn more about the last prisoner-baby program in California and how the penal system handles these new mothers on KPCC’s Pregnant In Prison special coverage.
KPCC is doing some awesome things. Check out this extensive reporting and lovely photos. -Emily
Photo Credit: Mae Ryan/KPCC
audiovision:
All of these photos were taken in prison.
At The Community Prisoner Mother Program in Pomona a select group of low level offenders can live with their young children until the child turns seven years old.
In 2011 and 2012, 233 inmates in California’s prison system gave birth while serving their sentences.
In most cases, the newborns went to live with relatives while the women were in prison, but some women had the opportunity to live with their children behind bars.
Learn more about the last prisoner-baby program in California and how the penal system handles these new mothers on KPCC’s Pregnant In Prison special coverage.
KPCC is doing some awesome things. Check out this extensive reporting and lovely photos. -Emily
Photo Credit: Mae Ryan/KPCC
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Francis Bacon photographed by Peter Beard (1972)
Francis Bacon photographed by Peter Beard (1972)
Francis Bacon photographed by Peter Beard (1972)
Francis Bacon photographed by Peter Beard (1972)
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Jun Ahn
Jun Ahn
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Bangsang Hyeok
Bangsang Hyeok
Bangsang Hyeok
Bangsang Hyeok
Bangsang Hyeok
Bangsang Hyeok
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likeafieldmouse:

Mark Cohen
"Cohen has spent decades doing hit-and-run street photography in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. His pictures are always taken from waist-height, and he’s taken 800,000 shots he’s never even seen.
His furtive shooting technique has always been laced with danger. One of his images is of a man, angered by the invasion of his personal space, swinging a punch at him [last image]. ’That type of interaction took a psychological toll over the years,’ he says. ‘I made a lot of nifty pictures by being that close to people. But after a while, I went to a wider lens. 28mm. Then 35mm. Now I’m at 50mm, so I feel very safe.’
But isn’t getting audaciously close, almost predatory, integral to his work? ‘The trespass makes it happen, yes,’ he says. ‘When you’re trying to make a new object, you’ve got to make something happen. And you learn to read people’s reactions quickly.’ After all these years, honing in on details to find images has become automatic.
'I get on a trolley and go to a specific intersection. I like to go to the same one 10 times, so I understand the texture of the neighborhood,' he says. As for Wilkes-Barre, he sees no need to dwell on it any more: 'The slice of America I've been looking at is everywhere.'”
likeafieldmouse:

Mark Cohen
"Cohen has spent decades doing hit-and-run street photography in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. His pictures are always taken from waist-height, and he’s taken 800,000 shots he’s never even seen.
His furtive shooting technique has always been laced with danger. One of his images is of a man, angered by the invasion of his personal space, swinging a punch at him [last image]. ’That type of interaction took a psychological toll over the years,’ he says. ‘I made a lot of nifty pictures by being that close to people. But after a while, I went to a wider lens. 28mm. Then 35mm. Now I’m at 50mm, so I feel very safe.’
But isn’t getting audaciously close, almost predatory, integral to his work? ‘The trespass makes it happen, yes,’ he says. ‘When you’re trying to make a new object, you’ve got to make something happen. And you learn to read people’s reactions quickly.’ After all these years, honing in on details to find images has become automatic.
'I get on a trolley and go to a specific intersection. I like to go to the same one 10 times, so I understand the texture of the neighborhood,' he says. As for Wilkes-Barre, he sees no need to dwell on it any more: 'The slice of America I've been looking at is everywhere.'”
likeafieldmouse:

Mark Cohen
"Cohen has spent decades doing hit-and-run street photography in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. His pictures are always taken from waist-height, and he’s taken 800,000 shots he’s never even seen.
His furtive shooting technique has always been laced with danger. One of his images is of a man, angered by the invasion of his personal space, swinging a punch at him [last image]. ’That type of interaction took a psychological toll over the years,’ he says. ‘I made a lot of nifty pictures by being that close to people. But after a while, I went to a wider lens. 28mm. Then 35mm. Now I’m at 50mm, so I feel very safe.’
But isn’t getting audaciously close, almost predatory, integral to his work? ‘The trespass makes it happen, yes,’ he says. ‘When you’re trying to make a new object, you’ve got to make something happen. And you learn to read people’s reactions quickly.’ After all these years, honing in on details to find images has become automatic.
'I get on a trolley and go to a specific intersection. I like to go to the same one 10 times, so I understand the texture of the neighborhood,' he says. As for Wilkes-Barre, he sees no need to dwell on it any more: 'The slice of America I've been looking at is everywhere.'”
likeafieldmouse:

Mark Cohen
"Cohen has spent decades doing hit-and-run street photography in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. His pictures are always taken from waist-height, and he’s taken 800,000 shots he’s never even seen.
His furtive shooting technique has always been laced with danger. One of his images is of a man, angered by the invasion of his personal space, swinging a punch at him [last image]. ’That type of interaction took a psychological toll over the years,’ he says. ‘I made a lot of nifty pictures by being that close to people. But after a while, I went to a wider lens. 28mm. Then 35mm. Now I’m at 50mm, so I feel very safe.’
But isn’t getting audaciously close, almost predatory, integral to his work? ‘The trespass makes it happen, yes,’ he says. ‘When you’re trying to make a new object, you’ve got to make something happen. And you learn to read people’s reactions quickly.’ After all these years, honing in on details to find images has become automatic.
'I get on a trolley and go to a specific intersection. I like to go to the same one 10 times, so I understand the texture of the neighborhood,' he says. As for Wilkes-Barre, he sees no need to dwell on it any more: 'The slice of America I've been looking at is everywhere.'”
likeafieldmouse:

Mark Cohen
"Cohen has spent decades doing hit-and-run street photography in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. His pictures are always taken from waist-height, and he’s taken 800,000 shots he’s never even seen.
His furtive shooting technique has always been laced with danger. One of his images is of a man, angered by the invasion of his personal space, swinging a punch at him [last image]. ’That type of interaction took a psychological toll over the years,’ he says. ‘I made a lot of nifty pictures by being that close to people. But after a while, I went to a wider lens. 28mm. Then 35mm. Now I’m at 50mm, so I feel very safe.’
But isn’t getting audaciously close, almost predatory, integral to his work? ‘The trespass makes it happen, yes,’ he says. ‘When you’re trying to make a new object, you’ve got to make something happen. And you learn to read people’s reactions quickly.’ After all these years, honing in on details to find images has become automatic.
'I get on a trolley and go to a specific intersection. I like to go to the same one 10 times, so I understand the texture of the neighborhood,' he says. As for Wilkes-Barre, he sees no need to dwell on it any more: 'The slice of America I've been looking at is everywhere.'”
likeafieldmouse:

Mark Cohen
"Cohen has spent decades doing hit-and-run street photography in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. His pictures are always taken from waist-height, and he’s taken 800,000 shots he’s never even seen.
His furtive shooting technique has always been laced with danger. One of his images is of a man, angered by the invasion of his personal space, swinging a punch at him [last image]. ’That type of interaction took a psychological toll over the years,’ he says. ‘I made a lot of nifty pictures by being that close to people. But after a while, I went to a wider lens. 28mm. Then 35mm. Now I’m at 50mm, so I feel very safe.’
But isn’t getting audaciously close, almost predatory, integral to his work? ‘The trespass makes it happen, yes,’ he says. ‘When you’re trying to make a new object, you’ve got to make something happen. And you learn to read people’s reactions quickly.’ After all these years, honing in on details to find images has become automatic.
'I get on a trolley and go to a specific intersection. I like to go to the same one 10 times, so I understand the texture of the neighborhood,' he says. As for Wilkes-Barre, he sees no need to dwell on it any more: 'The slice of America I've been looking at is everywhere.'”
likeafieldmouse:

Mark Cohen
"Cohen has spent decades doing hit-and-run street photography in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. His pictures are always taken from waist-height, and he’s taken 800,000 shots he’s never even seen.
His furtive shooting technique has always been laced with danger. One of his images is of a man, angered by the invasion of his personal space, swinging a punch at him [last image]. ’That type of interaction took a psychological toll over the years,’ he says. ‘I made a lot of nifty pictures by being that close to people. But after a while, I went to a wider lens. 28mm. Then 35mm. Now I’m at 50mm, so I feel very safe.’
But isn’t getting audaciously close, almost predatory, integral to his work? ‘The trespass makes it happen, yes,’ he says. ‘When you’re trying to make a new object, you’ve got to make something happen. And you learn to read people’s reactions quickly.’ After all these years, honing in on details to find images has become automatic.
'I get on a trolley and go to a specific intersection. I like to go to the same one 10 times, so I understand the texture of the neighborhood,' he says. As for Wilkes-Barre, he sees no need to dwell on it any more: 'The slice of America I've been looking at is everywhere.'”
likeafieldmouse:

Mark Cohen
"Cohen has spent decades doing hit-and-run street photography in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. His pictures are always taken from waist-height, and he’s taken 800,000 shots he’s never even seen.
His furtive shooting technique has always been laced with danger. One of his images is of a man, angered by the invasion of his personal space, swinging a punch at him [last image]. ’That type of interaction took a psychological toll over the years,’ he says. ‘I made a lot of nifty pictures by being that close to people. But after a while, I went to a wider lens. 28mm. Then 35mm. Now I’m at 50mm, so I feel very safe.’
But isn’t getting audaciously close, almost predatory, integral to his work? ‘The trespass makes it happen, yes,’ he says. ‘When you’re trying to make a new object, you’ve got to make something happen. And you learn to read people’s reactions quickly.’ After all these years, honing in on details to find images has become automatic.
'I get on a trolley and go to a specific intersection. I like to go to the same one 10 times, so I understand the texture of the neighborhood,' he says. As for Wilkes-Barre, he sees no need to dwell on it any more: 'The slice of America I've been looking at is everywhere.'”
likeafieldmouse:

Mark Cohen
"Cohen has spent decades doing hit-and-run street photography in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. His pictures are always taken from waist-height, and he’s taken 800,000 shots he’s never even seen.
His furtive shooting technique has always been laced with danger. One of his images is of a man, angered by the invasion of his personal space, swinging a punch at him [last image]. ’That type of interaction took a psychological toll over the years,’ he says. ‘I made a lot of nifty pictures by being that close to people. But after a while, I went to a wider lens. 28mm. Then 35mm. Now I’m at 50mm, so I feel very safe.’
But isn’t getting audaciously close, almost predatory, integral to his work? ‘The trespass makes it happen, yes,’ he says. ‘When you’re trying to make a new object, you’ve got to make something happen. And you learn to read people’s reactions quickly.’ After all these years, honing in on details to find images has become automatic.
'I get on a trolley and go to a specific intersection. I like to go to the same one 10 times, so I understand the texture of the neighborhood,' he says. As for Wilkes-Barre, he sees no need to dwell on it any more: 'The slice of America I've been looking at is everywhere.'”
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COMFORT ZONE BY TADAO CERN
Photographer Tadao Cern (Real people - real stories) - "I spent this summer on various beaches taking pictures of strangers in their ‘Comfort Zone’. These photos are not staged and every single detail in them tells us a different story about ourselves. This is only a part of the collection and project consist of 24 large scale prints. Images are for sale in limited edition."
[ previously: here ]
COMFORT ZONE BY TADAO CERN
Photographer Tadao Cern (Real people - real stories) - "I spent this summer on various beaches taking pictures of strangers in their ‘Comfort Zone’. These photos are not staged and every single detail in them tells us a different story about ourselves. This is only a part of the collection and project consist of 24 large scale prints. Images are for sale in limited edition."
[ previously: here ]
COMFORT ZONE BY TADAO CERN
Photographer Tadao Cern (Real people - real stories) - "I spent this summer on various beaches taking pictures of strangers in their ‘Comfort Zone’. These photos are not staged and every single detail in them tells us a different story about ourselves. This is only a part of the collection and project consist of 24 large scale prints. Images are for sale in limited edition."
[ previously: here ]
COMFORT ZONE BY TADAO CERN
Photographer Tadao Cern (Real people - real stories) - "I spent this summer on various beaches taking pictures of strangers in their ‘Comfort Zone’. These photos are not staged and every single detail in them tells us a different story about ourselves. This is only a part of the collection and project consist of 24 large scale prints. Images are for sale in limited edition."
[ previously: here ]
COMFORT ZONE BY TADAO CERN
Photographer Tadao Cern (Real people - real stories) - "I spent this summer on various beaches taking pictures of strangers in their ‘Comfort Zone’. These photos are not staged and every single detail in them tells us a different story about ourselves. This is only a part of the collection and project consist of 24 large scale prints. Images are for sale in limited edition."
[ previously: here ]
COMFORT ZONE BY TADAO CERN
Photographer Tadao Cern (Real people - real stories) - "I spent this summer on various beaches taking pictures of strangers in their ‘Comfort Zone’. These photos are not staged and every single detail in them tells us a different story about ourselves. This is only a part of the collection and project consist of 24 large scale prints. Images are for sale in limited edition."
[ previously: here ]
COMFORT ZONE BY TADAO CERN
Photographer Tadao Cern (Real people - real stories) - "I spent this summer on various beaches taking pictures of strangers in their ‘Comfort Zone’. These photos are not staged and every single detail in them tells us a different story about ourselves. This is only a part of the collection and project consist of 24 large scale prints. Images are for sale in limited edition."
[ previously: here ]
COMFORT ZONE BY TADAO CERN
Photographer Tadao Cern (Real people - real stories) - "I spent this summer on various beaches taking pictures of strangers in their ‘Comfort Zone’. These photos are not staged and every single detail in them tells us a different story about ourselves. This is only a part of the collection and project consist of 24 large scale prints. Images are for sale in limited edition."
[ previously: here ]
COMFORT ZONE BY TADAO CERN
Photographer Tadao Cern (Real people - real stories) - "I spent this summer on various beaches taking pictures of strangers in their ‘Comfort Zone’. These photos are not staged and every single detail in them tells us a different story about ourselves. This is only a part of the collection and project consist of 24 large scale prints. Images are for sale in limited edition."
[ previously: here ]
COMFORT ZONE BY TADAO CERN
Photographer Tadao Cern (Real people - real stories) - "I spent this summer on various beaches taking pictures of strangers in their ‘Comfort Zone’. These photos are not staged and every single detail in them tells us a different story about ourselves. This is only a part of the collection and project consist of 24 large scale prints. Images are for sale in limited edition."
[ previously: here ]
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Photoquai 2013: Qingjun Huang, Family Stuff
Photoquai 2013: Qingjun Huang, Family Stuff
Photoquai 2013: Qingjun Huang, Family Stuff
Photoquai 2013: Qingjun Huang, Family Stuff
Photoquai 2013: Qingjun Huang, Family Stuff
Photoquai 2013: Qingjun Huang, Family Stuff
Photoquai 2013: Qingjun Huang, Family Stuff
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Cindy Wright
Cindy Wright
Cindy Wright
Cindy Wright
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Txema Salvans
Txema Salvans
Txema Salvans